FAQ

WHEN DOES THE LEAGUE PLAY?

we play year round. as soon as one season ends, the next begins.

ON WHAT DAYS ARE GAMES PLAYED?

from march to november, we play on saturday afternoons and sometimes tuesdays and wednesdays in the early evening. from november to march, we play on saturday afternoons, sunday late mornings and afternoons, and sometimes and sometimes tuesdays and wednesdays in the early evening.

WHAT IS THE FORMAT OF THE GAMES AND COMPOSITION OF TEAMS?

5-on-5 and a goalie, USA Hockey rules (non-checking), with offsides and icing enforced. teams may have no more than 18 “skaters” and 2 goalies at any game. teams are allowed to have an alternates roster, though. players can be on only one team’s roster, and cannot play for other teams. during regular season games, registered goalies may play for any team that needs them.

WHAT GEAR IS REQUIRED?

all goalies must have full goalie gear, including helmet/cage. all players must, at the minimum, have eye protection and protective (hockey) gloves. but it is strongly recommended that players use shinguards, street hockey helmet/cage, and whatever other protective equipment available.

WHERE IN NEW YORK CAN I BUY HOCKEY GEAR?

aside from on-line shops, there are a few local pro shops and sports stores to get sticks, gloves, etc.  also, the league sells protective eye wear for $5.

Westside Skate & Stick
174 5th Ave. #504
New York, NY 10010
212-228-8400

NY Skate Pro
at City Ice Pavilion
47-32 32nd Pl.
Long Island City, NY
718-706-6667

others that you can search:
Wonderland of Ice at Chelsea Piers
Paragon on Broadway by 18th St.
Modell’s (various locations in NY and NJ)

HOW MANY TEAMS ARE THERE AND WHAT IS THE LEVEL OF PLAY?

the 2012 winter/spring season had 11 teams. the skill range can be quite wide, so we have a weighted schedule, so that the more experienced teams face each other more often, and the less experienced teams get more games with similarly skilled opponents.

HOW DO I JOIN?

everyone must register with the league. there is a registration link on the website. if you are not on a team, register as a “free agent looking to join a team”. the league doesn’t directly place free agents on teams, but helps free agents find teams looking for players. the team captains are in charge of the team rosters. often the league will hold free agent scrimmages, to introduce the free agents to the captains and help them get on a team. players should also join the mofo hockey email list (an announce only list) for updates on the schedule, rules, etc.  http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/MOFOhockey/

WHAT DOES IT COST TO PLAY?

the league charges a team fee — fees are not collected from individual players. the team captains collect the individual players’ fees and pay the league the team fee. on average, it’s about $100 per player per season.

WHO RUNS THE GAMES?

there is a league manager who schedules the games, takes care of the gear and rink, and makes sure that everything is working properly. he assigns one score keeper and two professional (USA Hockey certified) referees per game.

ARE THERE ANY OTHER OPPORTUNITIES TO PLAY OUTSIDE OF THE MOFO LEAGUE?

there are weekday scrimmages sometimes organized through this group:

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/hockeyscrimmage/

there are saturday morning scrimmages organized through this group:

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/2bhl/

roller hockey: http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/rollerscrimmage/

WHAT’S BTSH, AND IS IT DIFFERENT FROM MOFO HOCKEY?

BTSH was founded in 2000 and is the sibling league to MOFO, which are both affiliated with the URBAN HOCKEY ASSN. OF NYC, INC., a non-profit charitable organization that also runs a YOUTH STREET HOCKEY program. the main differences between the BTSH and MOFO are that BTSH is co-ed mandatory (teams must have a minimum of 2 women playing at all times), it plays in a playground rather than a rink (Tompkins Sq. Park), has a longer season, only plays from march to november, is larger (20 teams), uses volunteer (player) referees, is more low-key/less competitive, and has many non-standard rules intended to keep play safe and non-aggressive (no slapshots, high stick is above the waist, no follow-throughs above the knee, etc.).